Category Archives: NYC

A Wish for Spring on a Raw Day

The blizzard that was forecast for New York City turned out to be strong winds, some snow and icy rain.  Whew! I used this stay-inside day to complete a final exam and to block a newly-discovered air leak in the apartment. Strong winds will do that. In one class we had to copyedit a tomato recipe that looked so good that I plan to make it for tonight’s dinner. Continue reading A Wish for Spring on a Raw Day

Union Square’s Seasonal Transformation

The calendar and political climate have caused New York’s Union Square to make dramatic changes in just the past two weeks. Politics and the holiday shopping season collide.

Many gathered at the park to speak of their discomfort with the presidential election results. It was a friendly scene; I thanked one speaker for urging protesters to select one thing to be activist about rather than be overwhelmed by the big picture. This turned into a casual conversation between two people  who were, clearly, older than most of the rest of the attendees. This is Union Square at 14th Street on November 10: Continue reading Union Square’s Seasonal Transformation

The Hudson River at Dusk

10-11-16 Hudson River, Statue of Liberty and New JerseyIn Midtown Manhattan it’s so easy to forget that New York is a city of active rivers, with shipping and ferries, sightseeing boats and sights to see. This is the view at sunset near where I currently work in New York City. Continue reading The Hudson River at Dusk

Celebrating Life in the Sharing Economy

FH 5/14/15Last May I alluded to the new economy, one based on sharing rather than owning, on dealing with new ways of being employed.

And right about that time, I unexpectedly became a roommate. Continue reading Celebrating Life in the Sharing Economy

Cameras Partner to Catch Drivers

QB @ 108/71/ContinentalAn expensive, annoying pest is proliferating high above New York City streets: traffic cameras.

Local law sets the driving speed limit at 25 miles per hour, which is 40.23 kilometers for my metric friends. It’s part of the weirdly-named Vision Zero initiative and has reportedly saved lives. I still believe it’s overkill. Continue reading Cameras Partner to Catch Drivers

City Summer

Wow, have I gone soft!

I live on the top floor and what I remember most from science classes is that heat rises. I’m reminded of that every day that I wait for my landlord to replace the broken air conditioner.

I grew up without air conditioning. That was my normal. We did what we always did, just sweaty and, probably, a little stinky. If it became unbearable we took quick showers or ran through people’s lawn sprinklers. And yes, the year I lived in the Bronx I enjoyed the fire hydrants with all the other kids. Three life lessons in one: tough enough to handle the water pressure, grateful that someone (illegally?) opened the hydrants up for us, nimble enough to dodge the cars because we were, after all, in the street. Continue reading City Summer

City Respites and Trees That Curve

One of the few things the City of New York does consistently well is build parks. It’s a strange claim to fame for a metropolis but we really have some nice parks.

This park is in a residential area across the water from LaGuardia Airport. I like how the curve of the trees let you see the airplane landing in the distance. By the way, this is the airport  that was rightly insulted by none other than our Vice President.  Continue reading City Respites and Trees That Curve

Outta Your Heels, On Your Feet

After seeing the musical “On Your Feet,” we came upon this pair of abandoned shoes at Penn Station, a New York commuter rail station.Penn Station, New York

I was fascinated by those shoes, pretty black pumps that may have been ditched after a night out. Was she running for a train? Were they danced in or stepped on? The shoes were gone the next day. I hope they got a second life.

Much like the Estefan hits. Continue reading Outta Your Heels, On Your Feet

Blogathon and Learning To Like Co-Working

thinking roomBloglife doesn’t always have to be a solitary life.

Many of us have chosen to read or create in public places: think diner, coffee shop or a blanket in a grassy park. A new industry is popping up that provides workspaces with desks, wifi, human contact and an industrious environment. With conventional companies outsourcing and hiring contract workers for distinct tasks – like writing – this is the office of the future. Continue reading Blogathon and Learning To Like Co-Working

Sad to Glad: Cheering Up In The Salt Marsh

Alley Pond Environmental CenterDriving on the Boulevard, I stopped for a think at a nature preserve. I felt a lot like this windmill: weathered, with resting places for everyone but me.

BUT a brief walk revealed beauty in the chilly, stark surroundings. Continue reading Sad to Glad: Cheering Up In The Salt Marsh

Why I Will Not Take Off My Backpack

Backpacks on the subwayThe New York subway system has been attempting to teach riders to be more courteous. Great, as we have an often undeserved reputation for being rude riders. But the most ill-conceived idea involves backpacks.

Backpacks are a practical way to carry books, work supplies and lunch. They’re kinder to the spine than a heavy tote or messenger bag that causes an uneven distribution of weight. Here’s why I won’t take mine off on the train: Continue reading Why I Will Not Take Off My Backpack